Post Contract Signing Considerations For The New York Contractor

Contractors and subcontractors frequently consult with their attorneys in the negotiation of construction contracts before they are signed, but counsel’s involvement generally ends at that point until and unless litigation arises down the road. Nevertheless, additional consultation with attorneys after execution of contracts can ensure that contractors and subcontractors meet their respective obligations and may confer savings that far offset the costs.

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Five Crucial Surety Bond Principles for New York Contractors

Long Island Construction Law does not own this content. The following article has been written by Danielle Rodabaugh, who has outlined an informative examination of bonding principles in New York construction.

Although surety bonds have been used to regulate New York’s construction industry for decades, many contractors still have a limited understanding of their purpose.

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Top 5 Tips for New York Residential Contractors

Often times in discussions with contractors, I hear many of the same types of issues repeat themselves, and from the perspective of counsel, quite preventable. While not every potential problem on a project can be determined upfront, keeping the following 5 tips for contractors in mind might be helpful in preventing problems, improving business practices, and effectively managing risks.

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The Home Improvement Licensing Rule: A Shield And Not A Sword

If you have read previous articles of this blog, you may be aware that New York construction contractors can be barred from suing or enforcing a mechanic’s lien if they do not possess required home improvement licenses, which has resulted in the dismissal of many contractors’ claims. On the other hand, project owners sometimes argue that a contractor’s failure to possess a license should not only prevent the contractor from recovering more money but should require the contractor to return all monies already paid for the work. Courts’ responses to this argument have been mixed.

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Homeowner Liability for Contractor Injuries in New York

Can homeowners be held responsible for injuries that may occur to contractors while work is being done on their property? Many homeowners love new home face-lifts, but did they ever think what a dangerous home improvement job consisted of? Well, what happens if a contractor is injured while working? Who is responsible for their medical costs?

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The Inconvenient Termination for Convenience

Many construction contracts in New York make reference to how or why one or both parties are provided the right to terminate the agreement. One such typical form of termination, ‘Termination for Convenience’, may be provided.

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Construction Business Owner Challenges Complying With New Employment and Labor Laws

Owners of New York based construction businesses are more likely to be mindful of construction law issues relating to contract performance and defective work. Many however are unaware they are also under increasing risks of liability in compliance with newly enacted requirements under New York Employment and Labor Laws.

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Recent New York Litigation Highlights Increasing Risks to Contractors

Construction contracts require contractors and subcontractors to carry commercial general liability, or CGL, insurance and to name not only the contracting parties but additional third parties, such as project owners, as additional insured. Recent commercial general liability litigation, however, suggests that contractors and subcontractors should review the language of their CGL policies carefully because third parties to the contract, even if they are contractually required to be additionally insured, may actually be excluded by the insurance policies.

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Networking Opportunities in New York Construction

Construction, in particular, adapts and responds to changes as a regular course of business. From changes in codes, regulations, and client preferences, staying abreast of the trends influencing the industry is essential for those who hope to earn their living from it.

Networking has always been an important function for anyone running a business.

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