Contractor Scaffold Law Liability

Much construction litigation arises from disputes over Scaffold Law liability. Simply, the Scaffold Law makes certain contractors and project owners liable for injuries to workers on construction sites. The Scaffold Law has been criticized for the burdens it imposes on contractors and owners and for allowing workers to collect even if they have ignored safety rules.

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What About the Neighbors? How Contractor Liability Can Extend to Neighbors

 

Are contractors responsible for the impacts of their work on neighboring residents? Oftentimes, they are. This is especially true in densely populated urban areas where literally hundreds of people could be affected by a project only fifty feet away. Some of the principles in these cases are outlined below.

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New York Construction Delays, All Things Being Equal, They’re Not

Everyone knows that time is money, and in particular this is true with New York construction contracts. It is also well known that delays are often part of the construction reality, along with change orders and extras. Delays impact owners, contractors and subcontractors.

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Construction Business Owner Challenges Complying With New Employment and Labor Laws

Owners of New York based construction businesses are more likely to be mindful of construction law issues relating to contract performance and defective work. Many however are unaware they are also under increasing risks of liability in compliance with newly enacted requirements under New York Employment and Labor Laws.

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Should Architects Be Exempt From Continuing Education?

The New York Education Department, Office of the Professions, regulates the licensing of the various professions, such as Lawyers, Certified Public Accountants, Architects, and other professions practicing within the state. Typically these professionals must pass initial education and examination requirements, and are also required to maintain certain levels of continuing education units. These requirements are intended to foster continued education and training throughout their career.

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Top 5 Contractor Defenses in New York

 

Contractors are not only responsible for performing their contracted work, but are also charged with keeping the owner and the subcontractors working together to bring the project to completion successfully. Given this, they are regularly the subject of legal disputes. For this reason, many could benefit from an understanding of the following top 5 contractor defenses available in New York.

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Are We On The Same Page? How Construction Document Conflicts Are Resolved

Given the large number and variety of documents required to administer a construction project today (plans, specifications, contracts, etc.), the likelihood of discrepancies arising between these different sources is almost unavoidable. Do you know how these documents rate in terms of their authority?

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Essential Provisions for Subcontractor Agreements

When it comes to subcontractor agreements, there are numerous types of agreements that might be used and the fine print in these agreements can be crucial. Some documents, such as the American Institute of Architects (AIA) 401 and the Associated General Contractors of America (AGC) Form 640 serve as standard forms of agreement.

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Blending of Public and Private Construction – Proceed With Caution

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Traditionally, New York Construction Law sets separate rules of engagement for public projects (where the owner is a public entity) and those that are private construction projects (where the owner is a private individual or corporation). Given these two distinct camps, it has been easy to classify a project as either a public project or a private one. For contractors, subcontractors and suppliers, knowing which rules of engagement pertain to them is essential to avoid making costly mistakes.

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The Top 5 Avenues of Architect Liability in New York

Architects in New York can be found liable for damages in various situations, depending on who claims damage, and the basis of the claim itself. For example, where an owner has a direct contract with the architect, the owner could bring forth a simple claim based on the contract or a claim based on a tort action. Such a tort action, based on negligence, is a claim for malpractice.

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