US Construction Spending Edges Up Tiny 0.1% In July

Content: Long Island Construction Law did not create this content. This article was written by The Associated Press, and was published to the Long Island Business News on September 1st, 2020.

U.S. construction spending edged up a tiny 0.1% in July, breaking a string of losses due to disruptions caused by the coronavirus pandemic. The Commerce Department reported that the slight July gain followed a 0.5% decline in June. In July, spending on residential construction rose a solid 2.1% while nonresidential construction fell by 1%.

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5 Reasons that may Justify the Termination of your Construction Agreement

This is a general information article and should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion. Readers are encouraged to seek counsel from a construction lawyer for advice on a particular circumstance.

When homeowners are ready to get the ball rolling with their new construction project, excitement and happy emotions usually take over when signing the construction agreement. With that said, however, there is an important relationship from start through final completion with your contractor, and significant issues could develop. When advising in breach of contract and contract termination cases, there are five examples all homeowners should look out for before pulling the trigger, that may justify your agreements termination. Continue reading “5 Reasons that may Justify the Termination of your Construction Agreement”

Long Island Construction Resurgence

Content: Long Island Construction Law did not create this content. This article was written by , and was published to the Long Island Business News on August 31st, 2020.

When COVID-19 hit the U.S. almost six months ago, businesses across Long Island had to shut their doors indefinitely. Real estate sales temporarily stopped, restaurants reimagined their spaces and construction projects were put on hold. Now as September nears, paused construction projects have restarted and many contractors have already gone back to work. Continue reading “Long Island Construction Resurgence”

What Construction Workers Need to Know about COVID-19

Content: Long Island Construction Law did not create this content. This article was published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on April 30th, 2020.

Today, we would like to share an informative article written by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention titled “What Construction Workers Need to Know about COVID-19”. Within this article, you will learn more about how to protect yourself and slow the spread, what steps your construction employer should take to ensure the safety of their staff, and how to maintain healthy operations of your business. To learn more about the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, please click the link here.

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Mount Sinai Plans $35M Wantagh Long Island Project

 

Content: Long Island Construction Law did not create this content. This article was written by , and was published to the Long Island Business News on August 11th, 2020.

Mount Sinai South Nassau and Mount Sinai Doctors will invest $35 million to refurbish a 60,000-square-foot building it owns in Wantagh. The long-vacant building at 2020 Wantagh Ave., formerly occupied by Verizon, will be renovated to provide multi-specialty healthcare services and advanced medical diagnostics.

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When is Lawyer Representation Truly Necessary?

Are you about to start a construction project and wondering whether hiring a Construction Lawyer is a necessary expense to add to your budget?  Wondering whether lawyers are recommended on large projects from start to finish or should lawyers be on the back burner until called upon?  Hiring a Construction Lawyer prior to beginning a construction project may become essential to protecting your rights, assets, and property, if (or when) faced with a defective construction project, an absent construction crew, or even a non-paying property owner.

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The Risks of Hiring Non-Local Subcontractors or Suppliers

Hiring a non-local subcontractor can lead to unanticipated issues for a contractor that otherwise could have been avoided if a local sub or supplier were hired instead.  Additionally, events that would ordinarily not seem to be an issue when using a local subcontractor, such as arranging an in-person meeting, have the potential to become much more complicated when trying to coordinate with an non-local subcontractor or supplier.  Keep reading for some important risks that homeowners and contractors should be aware of if contemplating hiring a non-local subcontractor or supplier.

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Long Island Construction Law Successfully Defends Homeowners Against Claims By Unlicensed Contractor

Despite much construction litigation, New York courts who govern Long Island construction law are agreed that an unlicensed home improvement contractor cannot recover against consumers. That has not, however, stopped unlicensed contractors from arguing exceptions to that rule. A recent court victory by John Caravella, Esq. confirms that courts remain unwilling to accept excuses from unlicensed contractors.

In Orefice v. Guma Development, homeowners sued an unlicensed contractor for defective construction. Notably, the local municipal code requires that any person doing business as a contractor be licensed by the municipality. A corporation does not require its own license if a licensed contractor is employed by the firm as a supervisor.

 

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