Networking Opportunities in New York Construction

Construction, in particular, adapts and responds to changes as a regular course of business. From changes in codes, regulations, and client preferences, staying abreast of the trends influencing the industry is essential for those who hope to earn their living from it.

Networking has always been an important function for anyone running a business.

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Protections Provided to New York Architects and Contractors under the Economic Loss Rule

THE ECONOMIC LOSS RULE IN NEW YORK CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS:

WHAT IT IS AND HOW IT MAY BENEFIT CONTRACTORS AND ARCHITECTS

The “economic loss rule” is a rule that New York courts use to prevent a plaintiff from recovering against a defendant for a tort (usually negligence), when the essence of the plaintiff’s claim is for failure to live up to the terms of a contract.

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Scaffold Law Claims Against Contractors Continue To Increase

 

Few topics in construction law are more controversial than Labor Law Section 240, better known as the Scaffold Law, which imposes absolute liability on contractors, property owners, and their agents for elevation-related injuries to construction workers. The number of Scaffold Law cases has increased by 500% since 1990.[1]

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Architect and Contractor Liability for New York Building Code Violations

CAN I BE SUED FOR VIOLATING THE BUILDING CODE?

CLAIMS AGAINST CONTRACTORS AND ARCHITECTS FOR CODE VIOLATIONS

 In my construction law practice, I’m often confronted with instances of building code violations and questions of whether building code violations should subject a contractor or architect to liability.

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Nassau County Bar Association Offers Alternatives To Litigation

Construction disputes are not going away any time soon, so every contractor will eventually be faced with the prospect of deciding whether to go to court to get paid for its work. Litigation in the court system has been the traditional collection method for contractors, but the length and costs of litigation mean that recovering might take years and absorb a chunk of your recovery, and the backlog in the court system has led courts to encourage litigants to seek alternatives to litigation – other means of getting paid.

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Contractors in New York may not be bound by Architect Certifications

Construction contracts in New York often place the architect or engineer in the additional role of an initial impartial decider as to any disagreement or disputes between the contractor and the owner, in addition to their roles as the design professionals.

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Violation of the New York Prompt Payment Act Does Not Bar Defenses

General Business Law Section 756 (and the sections that follow it), commonly known as the Prompt Payment Act, establish requirements for how soon a construction contractor or subcontractor must be paid and allow expedited arbitration in the event that prompt payment is not made for qualifying projects.

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Long Island Construction Employment Climbs Year Over Year

Long Island Construction Law did not create this content about Long Island Construction Employment. This article was written by David Winzelberg, and was published to the Long Island Business News on February 5th, 2020.

Construction employment on Long Island continued to increase in December compared with the previous year, according to the latest report from the Associated General Contractors of America.

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The Top 5 Avenues of Architect Liability in New York

Architects in New York can be found liable for damages in various situations, depending on who claims damage, and the basis of the claim itself. For example, where an owner has a direct contract with the architect, the owner could bring forth a simple claim based on the contract or a claim based on a tort action. Such a tort action, based on negligence, is a claim for malpractice.

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Construction Warranty vs. Statute of Limitations Between Builder and Owner

Like the strings of a marionette puppet, after the completion of a New York construction project there are various legal theories that serve as ties between the builder and the owner. For the builder, the sooner these lingering ties can be removed the less exposure they face for claims of defects. For the owners, the longer they are able to establish these connections the longer they may have legal recourse against the builder for defects, should that be necessary.

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