Construction Law Blog

Subcontractor Challenges under the New York Lien Law

The adage that you can not get blood from a stone may have its place in the rationale of New York Lien Law. Not that you will find this term included in any of the sections of the law, but this concept of reality is reflected in the hierarchy, structure, and availability of funds in the occurrence of a construction dispute.

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Deconstructing the Construction Contract

John Caravella, Esq. of The Law Offices of John Caravella, P.C. will be one of three presenters at the Nassau County Bar Association Construction Law Committee’s seminar, next in its series of presentations addressing issues in the field of Construction Law.

On December 18, 2012, at 12:30 pm, the Construction Law Committee in the Founders Room at the Home of the Association,  will present Deconstructing the Construction Contract.

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Contractors in New York may not be bound by Architect Certifications

Construction contracts in New York often place the architect or engineer in the additional role of an initial impartial decider as to any disagreement or disputes between the contractor and the owner, in addition to their roles as the design professionals.

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Construction Warranty vs. Statute of Limitations Between Builder and Owner

Like the strings of a marionette puppet, after the completion of a New York construction project there are various legal theories that serve as ties between the builder and the owner.

For the builder, the sooner these lingering ties can be removed the less exposure they face for claims of defects.

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NY Supreme Court Strikes Contractor Liability Limitation Provision

Many contractors and subcontractors go about their work feeling protected from claims for damages because their agreements contain certain exclusions. Some of these agreements will even have language stating ‘Not responsible for [X, Y, and Z]’.

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Pitfalls in Extending a Mechanic’s Lien on Residential Properties

A Lien (or ‘Mechanic’s Lien’) is a potentially powerful tool for contractors, architects, engineers, or suppliers of materials to secure payment for work performed ‘improving’ a property[1]. To properly ‘perfect’ a lien claim, however, strict compliance with the nuances of the New York lien law is required, and often times there are details in the process commonly overlooked.

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Five Crucial Surety Bond Principles for New York Contractors

The following article has been written by guest blogger Danielle Rodabaugh, who has outlined an informative examination of bonding principles in New York construction.

Although surety bonds have been used to regulate New York’s construction industry for decades, many contractors still have a limited understanding of their purpose.

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If You Want a Construction Contract Enforced, You Need Your License

Recently, a contractor asked me how to create a good contract. After further discussion, I understood that this contractor was not licensed, but wanted advice on obtaining a good contract.

Well, what is a good contract after all?

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Construction Contract Drafting Considerations

To minimize potential legal problems when planning construction, whether the project is a large commercial project, a new residence, or even a renovation to an existing structure, care must be taken to have essential terms included in the contract.

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