Construction Law Blog

Why Homeowners are Vulnerable When Hiring an Unlicensed Contractor

Cost efficiency is generally a high priority on a homeowner’s list when beginning a home improvement project.  Unfortunately, many homeowners make the mistake of saving money by hiring an unlicensed contractor.  Although it may seem to be the more attractive, less expensive option, hiring an unlicensed contractor to save some money could be very problematic, leading to long-term negative financial effects.  This is due to the fact that there is no guarantee that an unlicensed contractor will have the necessary insurance policies in place to protect your property, themselves, their workers, and any other damages that may arise from their construction work.

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Your Contractor Abandoned Your Project – Now What?

Have you ever hired a contractor who disappeared on you?  Were you left with a half-completed home improvement project, with feelings of despair and frustration and not a clue as to what your next steps should be?  You’re left with unused materials, shortage of capital, and a literal construction site in your home.  Unfortunately, this happens to homeowners who hire both licensed and unlicensed contractors more often than you would think.  However, there is recourse available. Below we discuss the steps that you can take and actions that you can pursue when your contractor abandoned your project before the construction is completed.

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Is your Construction Site up to Safety Standards?

Eli Friedmann / Flickr

Working too quickly to meet a completion deadline, running to the opposite side of the construction site, or even failing to pay attention to safety standards can all be fatal on a construction site. It is crucial – and lifesaving – to understand and know the safety measures that you must take to protect yourself and others on any given job site. In this article, we will discuss the fundamentals of construction site safety.

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Homeowner Court Ruling Serves as a Reminder to New York Contractors

A recent ruling issued by the Supreme Court, County of Nassau, serves as a reminder to New York contractors performing residential work of the importance and necessity in having a home improvement license if you need legal action to pursue payment on the project.

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Commissioner’s Regulations in Architecture

Image: Caylon Hackwith

Though an architect is responsible for designs and drawings, they also play a part in structural safety. Whether building single-family homes or a large corporate building, a professional in the architectural industry must have the proper education and experience to practice. This article about the commissioner’s regulations in architecture was presented by John Caravella during the “Design Professionals in New York” speaking engagement produced by HalfMoon Seminars.

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Networking Opportunities in New York Construction

Construction, in particular, adapts and responds to changes as a regular course of business. From changes in codes, regulations, and client preferences, staying abreast of the trends influencing the industry is essential for those who hope to earn their living from it.

Networking has always been an important function for anyone running a business.

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Architectural Hierarchy 101

When you are working on a renovation project or building a home from the ground up, it is not just one person pulling the strings and leading the operation, learn the architectural hierarchy.  Behind every architectural firm is a small army of individuals with specific roles and responsibilities to make your dream a reality. Within this article, we will share the chain of command within an architectural firm. To learn what you should be looking for when hiring such architects, please review our blog posting titled “Considerations When Hiring an Architect” below.

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New US Home Construction Dips Again In February

 

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Content: Long Island Construction Law did not create this content. This article was written by The Associated Press, and was published to the Long Island Business News on March 18th, 2020.

New home construction fell again in February, but not as much as the previous month. Those declines follow a December surge which had pushed home construction to the highest level in 13 years. Builders started construction on 1.60 million homes at a seasonally adjusted annual rate, a decline of 1.5% from 1.62 million units in January, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday.

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Protections Provided to New York Architects and Contractors under the Economic Loss Rule

THE ECONOMIC LOSS RULE IN NEW YORK CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS:

WHAT IT IS AND HOW IT MAY BENEFIT CONTRACTORS AND ARCHITECTS

The “economic loss rule” is a rule that New York courts use to prevent a plaintiff from recovering against a defendant for a tort (usually negligence), when the essence of the plaintiff’s claim is for failure to live up to the terms of a contract.

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Scaffold Law Claims Against Contractors Continue To Increase

 

Few topics in construction law are more controversial than Labor Law Section 240, better known as the Scaffold Law, which imposes absolute liability on contractors, property owners, and their agents for elevation-related injuries to construction workers. The number of Scaffold Law cases has increased by 500% since 1990.[1]

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