Commissioner’s Regulations in Architecture

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Though an architect is responsible for designs and drawings, they also play a part in structural safety. Whether building single-family homes or a large corporate building, a professional in the architectural industry must have the proper education and experience to practice. This article about the commissioner’s regulations in architecture was presented by John Caravella during the “Design Professionals in New York” speaking engagement produced by HalfMoon Seminars.

  • 69.1 Professional Study and Experience Requirements for Architecture

Unless otherwise provided, acceptable accrediting agency means an accrediting agency which is recognized by the United States Commissioner of Education as a reliable authority for the purpose of accreditation at the post secondary level, and which applies its criteria for granting accreditation in a fair, consistent and nondiscriminatory manner.

To meet the professional education and experience requirements for licensure as an architect in the State, the applicant shall submit evidence of either.

  • Graduation from a professional program in architecture registered by the department, accredited by an acceptable accrediting agency, or determined by the department to be the equivalent of a registered or accredited program; and
  • Receipt of the degree of a Bachelor of Architecture or Master of Architecture, or the equivalent as determined by the department, from a school offering a program which meets the requirements of subparagraph above; and
  • Completion of a minimum of three years of architectural work experience of a scope and natural satisfactory to the State Board for Architecture; or
  • Completion of experience in architectural work acceptable to the State Board for Architecture or a combination of education and experience totaling 12 years which is determined by the department to be the equivalent of the education and experience described in paragraph 1 of this subdivision.

The department may accept a second professional degree in Architecture in lieu of not more than one year of work experience.

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  • 69.2 Professional Study and Experience Requirements for Architecture

The examination may include, but need not be limited to, architectural history, theory, construction, professional practice, building design and site planning. The department may accept satisfactory scores, reported on a pass / fail basis, on all or part of the written examination produced by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards.

To meet the professional education and experience requirements for admission to the licensing examination, an applicant shall submit evidence of completion of either:

  • Graduation from a professional program in architecture registered by the department, accredited by an acceptable accrediting agency as defined in section 69.1 of this Part, or determined by the department to be the equivalent of a registered or accredited program; and
  • Receipt of the degree of Bachelor of Architecture or Master of Architecture, or the equivalent as determined by the department, from a school offering a program which meets the requirements of subparagraph One of this paragraph; or
  • Completion of experience in architectural work acceptable to the State Board for Architecture or a combination of education and experience totaling 9 years which is determined by the department to be the equivalent o the education and experience credit described in section 69.1(b)(1) of this Part.
John Caravella, Esq

The author, John Caravella Esq., is a construction attorney and formerly practicing project architect at The Law Office of John Caravella, P.C., representing architects, engineers, contractors, subcontractors, and owners in all phases of contract preparation, litigation, and arbitration across New York and Florida. He also serves as an arbitrator to the American Arbitration Association Construction Industry Panel. Mr. Caravella can be reached by email: [email protected] or (631) 608-1346.

This is a general information article about the commissioner’s regulations in architecture and should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion. The content above has been edited for conciseness and additional relevant points are omitted for space constraints. Readers are encouraged to seek counsel from a construction lawyer who has experience with Long Island construction law for advice on a particular circumstance. To learn more about The Law Offices of John Caravella, visit www.liconstructionlaw.com