Construction Law Blog

The Inconvenient Termination for Convenience

Many construction contracts in New York make reference to how or why one or both parties are provided the right to terminate the agreement. One such typical form of termination, ‘Termination for Convenience’, may be provided.

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John Caravella’s Article on Scaffold Law Reform to be Featured in Nassau County Bar Association’s “The Nassau Lawyer” Publication

 

In January 2019, The Nassau Lawyer published an article written by Mr. Caravella, in response to wide range impacts related to contractors throughout New York, regarding the Scaffold Law Reform and current efforts in New York State. Contractors are encouraged to stay informed of these issues and reform efforts. To obtain a copy of this topic article, please visit www.nassaubar.org (Page 7) or visit www.liconstructionlaw.com

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The Home Improvement Licensing Rule: A Shield And Not A Sword

Photographer: Timothy Schenck

If you have read previous articles of this blog, you may be aware that New York construction contractors can be barred from suing or enforcing a mechanic’s lien if they do not possess required home improvement licenses, which has resulted in the dismissal of many contractors’ claims. On the other hand, project owners sometimes argue that a contractor’s failure to possess a license should not only prevent the contractor from recovering more money but should require the contractor to return all monies already paid for the work. Courts’ responses to this argument have been mixed.

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Construction Warranties in New York. Sometimes Less is More.

Any property owner considering construction work will want reassurance that the work will be done well, and will be free of defects for a specified time frame. Many contractors even include a warranty clause in their contract. Such warranties (also called guarantees) require the contractor to correct any defects through additional work on the project over the specified time. What are some of the specific factors within Construction Warranties?

Warranties under New York law may be found where they are expressly given, as in the example of the contractor above; but may also be implied through the conduct of the parties, or by operation of the law. For example, if the contractor agreement did not contain any warranty clause, the owner would be able to bring a legal action against the contractor for breach of warranty or contract within six years of project substantial completion under the New York Uniform Commercial Code. Many property owners may be surprised to learn that they may actually be better protected with no warranty provision in the agreement, over one that states coverage for a shorter time frame.

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Homeowner Liability for Contractor Injuries in New York

 

Can homeowners be held responsible for injuries that may occur to contractors while work is being done on their property? Many homeowners love new home face-lifts, but did they ever think what a dangerous home improvement job consisted of? Well, what happens if a contractor is injured while working? Who is responsible for their medical costs?

With respect to homeowner liability for contractor injuries in New York, homeowners of one or two family dwellings are exempt from liability from any contractor injuries suffered while work was performed on their property under labor law § 240 & § 241, unless he or she has directed or controlled the work being performed.

Under New York State Law §§ 240 and 241 a homeowner can be found liable for any resulting contractor injuries only if their contractor can show the homeowner provided specific instruction as to how work is to be performed or the homeowner provided certain tools or equipment to be used.

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Although, incidental homeowner interactions are not sufficient to invoke homeowner liability for injuries, a showing of directing the actual work performance is necessary.

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New Contractor Regulation Effective December 2014

A new contractor regulation has been implemented. Residential contractors in New York will soon be required to provide certain homeowners with information relating to the benefits and costs of having automatic fire sprinkler systems installed.

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John Caravella awarded 2014 Leadership in Law Award

UNIONDALE, NEW YORK (Nov. 8, 2014) – LIConstructionLaw.com attorney John Caravella was recently named 2014 Leadership in Law Award winner in its sole practitioner category as decided by nominating members of the Long Island business community.

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Deconstructing the Construction Contract

John Caravella, Esq. of The Law Offices of John Caravella, P.C. will be one of three presenters at the Nassau County Bar Association Construction Law Committee’s seminar, next in its series of presentations addressing issues in the field of Construction Law.

On December 18, 2012, at 12:30 pm, the Construction Law Committee in the Founders Room at the Home of the Association,  will present Deconstructing the Construction Contract.

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